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Fiscal Year 2018 Budgets for OC Toll Roads Approved After Year of Consistent Revenue Growth

IRVINE, Calif. - June 12, 2017

In FY17, year-over-year transactional toll revenue is projected to grow by over 7 percent and 6 percent for the Foothill/Eastern and San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agencies, respectively

The Agencies’ combined budgets totaling $360.3 million include funding for debt service, toll collection, customer service and capital project planning, engineering and construction

Following a year of increased revenue and implementation of programs to enhance customer service, the Boards of Directors of the Foothill/Eastern and San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) approved combined budgets totaling $360.3 million to fund debt service, operations, customer service, administration, planning, engineering and construction for Orange County’s Toll Road system.

In FY17, transactions recorded on the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads are expected to surpass the highest volumes recorded prior to the Great Recession. In May, the bond ratings for the 73 Toll Road were upgraded by S & P Global Ratings due to continued transaction and revenue growth.

Customer service improvements that were implemented in FY17 to support The Toll Roads’ nearly one million accountholders and more than 330,000 daily toll transactions included a new app that allows customers to pay tolls and manage their accounts from their handheld devices, a new contractor to provide customer service staffing and activities and the addition of Saturday hours for the Customer Service Call Center.

“The increase in traffic and revenue for The Toll Roads is a sign of a healthy economy and a valuable service,” said Ed Sachs, Chair of the Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency.  “The growth in revenue enables us to maintain a strong financial position and make investments in The Toll Roads to give drivers more options for traffic relief.”

The FY18 budgets include funding for the following capital project and customer service initiatives:

241/91 Express Connector Project ($13.0 million)
Final design is currently underway for this project that consists of a tolled connector between the median of the 91 Express Lanes and the median of the 241 Toll Road. The Supplemental EIR/EIS is scheduled to be final by the end of 2017 with anticipation of soliciting construction bids at the end of FY18.

Oso Parkway Bridge Project ($25.2 million)
In FY18, construction of the Oso Bridge Project will begin.  The project involves the construction of a bridge structure to allow traffic from the new Los Patrones Parkway to safely pass under Oso Parkway to access the 241 Toll Road near Coto de Caza. The construction contract will be administered by the County of Orange. Construction is slated to begin in fall 2017 and will be completed over a 24-month construction period.

South County Mobility Improvement Planning ($28.0 million)
In FY18, community outreach to identify and address public and stakeholder interest to identify traffic relief for South Orange County will continue. The formal state and federal environmental process will begin, which includes biological, traffic and geological technical studies that will be included in the Environmental Impact Report and Environmental Impact Statement.

Customer Service Center Back Office System Replacement Project ($2.8 million)
TCA has issued a Request for Proposals for a new system that will address the Agencies’ current and future needs. The amount budgeted will cover the cost of developing and implementing the new system.

Signage Upgrade ($6.0 million)
In FY18, per Federal Highway Administration standards for toll road signage, upgraded signs will be installed incorporating a purple banner across the top of the sign indicating that State Routes 73, 133, 241 and 261 are tolled roads.  Additional signs with payment information will also be posted. In all, 458 signs will be modified or replaced as part of this project prior to, or along the 51-Mile Toll Road system.

The FY18 budgets include a 4.8 percent and 5.5 percent increase in transactional toll revenue for the Foothill/Eastern and San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agencies respectively due to projected growth in transactions and a 2 percent toll increase for non-FasTrak® transactions at all toll points.  FasTrak tolls are $1 less than non-FasTrak tolls at all toll points.  FasTrak is the transponder-based electronic toll collection system that can be used on all tolled bridges, lanes and roads in California.  Non-FasTrak toll payment options include license-plate-based ExpressAccounts® and online One-Time-Toll®. ExpressAccount and One-Time-Toll payment are only available on the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads.  Toll rate adjustments will go into effect at 12:00 a.m. on Friday, July 1, 2017 and range from $0.03 to $0.16 depending on location.

“The Agencies maintain bond indenture reserves of over $500 million and expect to fill the last remaining San Joaquin Hills requirement in FY18,” said Amy Potter, Chief Financial Officer for TCA.

TCA is comprised of two joint powers authorities created to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County’s Toll Road network – the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads.  The Toll Roads have been providing a choice for drivers for more than 20 years and the tolls collected are used primarily to pay bonds issued to fund construction. The refinancing of TCA’s debt in 2013 and 2014 took advantage of historically low interest rates and established debt structures that align with The Toll Roads’ historical transaction and revenue growth -- including the dip in traffic that took place during the recent recession. Since then, transactions and revenue have exceeded projections and reserves have grown providing stability to weather future economic downturns and support financing of TCA’s Capital Improvement Program.

IRVINE, Calif. - May 1, 2017

A landmark agreement clearing the way for a solution to improve mobility in South Orange County and the Southern California region has won top honors in the 2017 Sustainability Awards from the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG).

The Foothill-South Settlement Agreement, announced this past November, follows a 20-year effort by the Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) to gain approval for the southern extension of State Route 241 (SR-241). The agreement clears the path for a new process and allows TCA to consider a number of transportation ideas including options connecting SR-241 to Interstate 5 while also protecting sensitive lands and cultural resources.

TCA is being recognized for Outstanding Achievement in Sustainability – one of seven category winners announced by SCAG, the nation’s largest metropolitan planning organization. The Sustainability Awards recognize excellence in coordinating land use and transportation to improve mobility, livability, prosperity and sustainability.

“The settlement agreement represents a responsible and practical approach to working with environmental communities on how best to proceed with solutions to the known mobility issues while preserving valued environmental areas and resources,” SCAG Executive Director Hasan Ikhrata said in announcing the award.

“For over two years, TCA and its team of experts engaged in thoughtful and productive discussions about the future of improving transportation mobility and the importance of protecting environmentally sensitive areas,” said TCA Chief Executive Officer Mike Kraman. “We believe that by working together towards a common goal, our respective groups were able to achieve a monumental decision that will benefit our community for years to come.”

The settlement agreement specifically:

  • Restricts TCA from building or funding a project within an area that includes San Onofre State Beach, the Richard and Donna O’Neill Conservancy and other critical open space, wildlife habitat and cultural resources in the San Mateo Creek watersheds
  • Requires TCA establish a $28 million conservation fund to help preserve and restore San Mateo Creek and its watershed as mitigation for a new alternative

TCA will be formally honored at an awards luncheon at SCAG’s 52nd annual Regional Conference and General Assembly on May 4 at the JW Marriott Desert Springs Resort & Spa in Palm Desert.

“We’re honored to recognize TCA and the settlement agreement – an incredibly complex effort that in the end will improve transportation mobility while protecting environmentally sensitive areas,” said Michele Martinez, a Santa Ana City Council member and President of SCAG.


About SCAG
SCAG is the nation’s largest metropolitan planning organization, representing six counties, 191 cities and more than 18 million residents. SCAG undertakes a variety of planning and policy initiatives to plan for a livable and sustainable Southern California now and in the future. For more information about SCAG’s regional efforts, please visit www.scag.ca.gov.

About TCA
The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) are two joint powers authorities formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County’s public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. More than three hundred thousand people from all over Southern California use TCA’s toll roads each day. Elected officials from surrounding cities and county supervisorial districts are appointed to serve on each agency’s board of directors. Public oversight ensures that the interests of local communities and drivers are served and that TCA continues to meet the region’s growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives. For more information about the Transportation Corridor Agencies, please visit TheTollRoads.com.

Orange County’s 51-mile toll road network has 300,000 daily customers and nearly one million customer accounts

IRVINE, Calif. - March 9, 2017

The Boards of Directors of the Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA), comprised of the San Joaquin Hills (SJHCTA) and Foothill/Eastern (F/ETCA) Transportation Corridor Agencies, selected Faneuil, Inc. to provide the staffing and management for The Toll Roads’ day-to-day customer service operations – a major milestone in TCA’s effort to continue enhancing customer service for the 300,000 daily drivers of Orange County’s 51-mile toll road system.

The Customer Service Center Operations contract is expected to be a ten-or-more-year agreement with an estimated $100 million value. Faneuil, Inc.’s contract will include call center operations, customer communications and account management, violation processing, FasTrak® transponder management and payment processing.

“Customer service is a high priority for TCA and awarding this contract is a significant milestone,” said F/ETCA Chair Ed Sachs and Mission Viejo Mayor Pro Tem. “Faneuil’s well-trained management and vast customer service experience will benefit our customers.”

The Toll Roads’ – State Routes 73, 133, 241 and 261 – customer service operations serve nearly one million FasTrak and ExpressAccount® customers. Each month, the call center manages more than 100,000 inbound calls, 3,300 walk-in customers and 11,000 electronic and paper correspondence.

Faneuil, Inc., headquartered in Hampton, Va., has provided outsourced customer service for an extensive client portfolio nationwide for more than 23 years, and manages more than 600 million customer interactions each year. Specific to the tolling industry, Faneuil, Inc. has provided customer care, back office, and violations processing support to agencies for more than 11 years for agencies similar to TCA.

“We welcome this opportunity to provide an exceptional customer service experience for Southern California residents and visitors who depend on TCA’s transportation network,” said Faneuil’s President and Chief Executive Officer, Anna Van Buren. “We thank the Agencies’ Directors for the confidence they have placed in us, and we are committed to serving TCA as a dedicated, collaborative partner for many years to come.”

“Through an extensive procurement process, TCA’s goal was to select a long-term, well-qualified firm who shares the Agencies’ priorities of improving efficiency, productivity, and customer service in a cost-effective manner,” said SJHTCA Chair Ross Chun and Aliso Viejo Councilman. “Faneuil clearly meets this goal.”

Some key highlights of Faneuil, Inc.’s contract include:

  • Offering employment to existing customer service staff to accelerate the transition between operators while ensuring that TCA’s operations are not impacted
  • An incentive structure to identify and successfully deliver innovative ideas that reduce costs and enhance TCA’s operations
  • Maintaining an optimum level of staffing that adjusts based upon projected seasonal and daily work volumes to ensure compliance with TCA’s performance requirements
  • The ability to continuously develop and incorporate best practices from the customer service industry and national operations

The contract is a performance-based, time and materials contract that will be capped by the number of hours needed to manage actual work volumes. The TCA Boards of Directors unanimously approved a five-year base term with optional extensions for up to ten additional years. The contract will be executed immediately with a transition period that will be completed by May 1, 2017, when Faneuil, Inc. officially takes over.

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) are two joint powers authorities formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County’s 67-mile public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. TCA continues to meet the region’s growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

F/ETCA Board of Directors approve items to start the formal environmental review of 16 transportation mobility project

IRVINE, Calif. - December 8, 2016

At its regularly scheduled board meeting, the Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency (F/ETCA) approved two items related to improving south Orange County mobility. These items allow the Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) to proceed with the California Department of Transportation’s (Caltrans) required environmental review and engineering process to evaluate 16 transportation mobility projects proposed by the public to alleviate traffic congestion in the region.

Last month, TCA settled five outstanding lawsuits with the Save San Onofre Coalition, as well as additional parties, clearing the path for this process to move forward. The settlement specifically:

  • Restricts TCA from building or funding a project within an area that includes San Onofre State Beach, the Richard and Donna O’Neill Conservancy and other critical open space, wildlife habitat and cultural resources in the San Mateo Creek watersheds
  • Requires TCA establish a $28 million conservation fund to help preserve and restore San Mateo Creek and its watershed as mitigation for a new alternative

“This is a significant milestone toward relieving traffic congestion for so many of our residents and commuters,” said Lisa Bartlett, F/ETCA Vice Chair and Orange County Supervisor, 5th District.  “Through a very deliberate public engagement process, we have hosted two public forums and solicited the community for input to establish their priorities and identify community-based solutions that will provide much needed traffic relief on our roads and freeways.” 

The results of this initial process will determine which alternatives will be carried forward through the formal environmental process required under the National Environmental Policy Act and the California Environmental Quality Act.

TCA will continue to engage in a stakeholder-driven community outreach process with elected officials, local and regional representatives, state transportation planning agencies, environmental leaders and the public to improve south Orange County mobility.

[Editor’s Note:] The Save San Onofre Coalition comprises the following 12 California and national environmental organizations: Audubon California, California Coastal Protection Network, California State Parks Foundation, Defenders of Wildlife, Endangered Habitats League, Laguna Greenbelt, Inc., Natural Resources Defense Council, Orange County Coastkeeper, Sea and Sage Audubon Society, Sierra Club, Surfrider Foundation and WiLDCOAST/COASTALVAjE.

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) are two joint powers authorities formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County’s public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. More than three hundred thousand people from all over Southern California use TCA’s toll roads each day.  Elected officials from surrounding cities and county supervisorial districts are appointed to serve on each agency’s board of directors. Public oversight ensures that the interests of local communities and drivers are served and that TCA continues to meet the region’s growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

The public may also view a pre-recorded presentation, review exhibits and comment on the project’s environmental document online.

IRVINE, Calif. - November 22, 2016

The public is invited to an open house style public meeting to learn about the proposed median-to-median tolled Express Connector directly linking the 241 Toll Road with the 91 Express Lanes near the Orange County and Riverside County border.

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) is holding the meeting from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 29 at the East Anaheim Community Center, 8201 Santa Ana Canyon Road in Anaheim Hills as part of the environmental phase of the project.

Conducted in an open house format, the meeting will provide the public with the opportunity to learn about the proposed project as well as to provide comments that will be addressed in the Final Environmental Report.

For those unable to attend the meeting in person, a pre-recorded presentation will be available for viewing after 5:30 p.m. on Nov. 29 at thetollroads.com/241-91connector and through Jan. 9, 2017. Copies of the meeting exhibits, project fact sheet, link to environmental document and opportunity to comment is also available on the project web page.

A Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Report / Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared and is available for public review and comment through Jan. 9, 2017. Comments can be submitted via:

  1. Email to D12.SR241-91ELC@dot.ca.gov
  2. U.S. Mail to
    Smita Deshpande, Generalist Branch Chief Caltrans
    District 12 / “ATTN: 241-91 DSEIR/EIS Comment Period”
    1750 East Fourth Street, Suite 100 Santa Ana, CA 92705

The proposed 241/91 Tolled Express Connector is expected to reduce traffic congestion on the SR-91 general purpose lanes, improve traffic flow and enhance safety by reducing weaving across multiple non-tolled lanes and by providing a direct connection between the 241 Toll Road and the 91 Express Lanes, and help achieve regional goals of reducing emissions by improving movement in congested areas along the 241 Toll Road and SR-91.

The project’s environmental phase is expected to be completed in late 2017, and if approved, construction would begin in mid-2018.

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) are two joint powers authorities formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County’s 67-mile public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. TCA continues to meet the region’s growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

IRVINE, Calif. - November 10, 2016

Agreement between Orange County toll road agency, Attorney General and a broad coalition of national and local environmental groups will protect San Onofre State Beach, the Richard and Donna O’Neill Conservancy and San Mateo Creek watershed while allowing exploration of other transportation solutions for South Orange County.

Announcing an end to the 15-year fight over the proposed Foothill-South Toll Road in southern Orange County and northern San Diego County, representatives from the Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency (TCA), California Attorney General Kamala Harris, the Save San Onofre Coalition, the California Park and Recreation Commission and the Native American Heritage Commission detailed the elements of a historic, comprehensive settlement.

The agreement presents an opportunity for TCA to consider a number of transportation project ideas including State Route 241 – Interstate 5 connection options while protecting sensitive lands and cultural resources within the San Mateo Creek watershed, including San Onofre State Beach and the Richard and Donna O’Neill Conservancy.

“TCA is very pleased to join over a dozen environmental organizations in this unprecedented outcome, which underscores the collaboration between the Agency’s leadership and leaders of the environmental community,” stated Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency Chairman Craig Young.

“For the past two years, TCA and its team of experts have engaged in thoughtful and productive discussions about the future of improving transportation mobility and the importance of protecting environmentally sensitive areas. This agreement is a baseline for achieving both of those objectives,” added Transportation Corridor Agencies Chief Executive Officer Mike Kraman.

“The Settlement Agreement reached today is the culmination of years of work by the Save San Onofre Coalition to ensure the protection of the extraordinary recreational, cultural and natural resources of San Onofre State Beach and the Richard and Donna O’Neill Conservancy,” commented Elizabeth Goldstein, president of the California State Parks Foundation and spokesperson for the Save San Onofre Coalition. “This agreement will guarantee that millions of Californians will be able to enjoy this magnificent park, its beaches and natural areas for years to come.”

This agreement resolves all outstanding litigation arising out of the TCA’s Foothill-South and Tesoro Extension plans to extend the 241 toll road in southern Orange County. Those plans were opposed by the Save San Onofre Coalition, the Attorney General and various state agencies because they would have significantly damaged environmental and cultural resources in San Onofre State Beach, the Richard and Donna O’Neill Conservancy and other open space lands. In 2008, the California Coastal Commission and the U.S. Secretary of Commerce found that the proposed Foothill-South alignment was inconsistent with state and federal coastal protection policies.

San Onofre State Beach, established in 1971 by then-Governor Ronald Reagan, is one of California’s most popular state parks, receiving more than 2.4 million visitors per year and providing habitat for 11 endangered or threatened species. San Onofre also offers low-cost recreational opportunities for working families and boasts a world-renowned surf spot at Trestles Beach.

“This agreement brings an end to one of the most hard fought, long-lasting environmental battles in California history, one that we have successfully pursued for the people of the region, our state’s natural heritage and the integrity of our state park system,” stated Joel Reynolds, western director and senior attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council. “Today's action is a definitive determination that the California state park at San Onofre will be preserved.”

The final agreement achieves the following objectives:

  1. Settles five lawsuits challenging TCA’s 2006 and 2013 approvals of its Foothill-South and Tesoro Extension projects brought by the California Attorney General and members of the Save San Onofre Coalition.
  2. Provides that TCA will rescind its 2006 approval of the so-called “Green Alignment” that would have run through San Onofre State Beach and its 2013 approval of its Tesoro Extension project.
  3. Ensures permanent protection of San Onofre State Beach, the Richard and Donna O’Neill Conservancy, and other critical open space, wildlife habitat and cultural resources in the San Mateo Creek and adjacent watersheds from TCA-sponsored road projects.
  4. Allows TCA to move forward with a formal CEQA/NEPA process to review alternative routes for connecting SR-241 to the Interstate 5 freeway and develop an SR-241 extension project that avoids San Onofre State Beach and other environmentally and culturally sensitive lands designated in the agreement, without opposition by the environmental organizations comprising the Save San Onofre Coalition.
  5. Establishes a cooperative framework by which an alignment for the SR-241 and other I-5 traffic congestion solutions can be identified, evaluated and potentially advanced in a manner that follows applicable laws, is consistent with recommendations issued by regulatory agencies in 2008, and meets south Orange County’s transportation needs.
  6. Creates a robust conservation fund to help preserve and restore San Mateo Creek and its watershed. An important component of the agreement is an unprecedented commitment by TCA to create a $28 million conservation fund that will help preserve and restore San Mateo Creek and its watershed. An independent oversight committee comprised of Save San Onofre Coalition members, TCA and resource agencies will work collaboratively to target priority land acquisitions and carry out critical habitat restoration projects.

“The San Mateo Creek Watershed is a unique undammed, intact watershed in coastal Southern California. Protecting the natural and recreational resources that depend upon it has been a key goal of the Save San Onofre Coalition,” added Dan Silver, executive director, Endangered Habitats League. “Through this agreement, we not only guarantee protection, but also gain positive benefits now and into the future.”

“This settlement agreement is the result of an innovative and collaborative process by a group of bold leaders who have worked together to develop an environmentally conscientious approach for the development of solutions to the region’s mobility challenges,” said Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency Vice Chair Lisa Bartlett, who is also the chairwoman of the Orange County Board of Supervisors.

The agreement also requires preparation of a Coastal Access Management Plan that will mitigate impacts from any construction of an alternative toll road alignment project, ensure continuous public shoreline access to San Onofre State Beach during construction of any project and result in permanent public access enhancements.

“Our coalition has worked diligently for more than a decade to save the park and the surrounding watershed.  This settlement agreement permanently protects these invaluable cultural, recreational and ecological resources that are treasured by the public,” concluded Stefanie Sekich-Quinn of the Surfrider Foundation.

[Editor’s Note:] The Save San Onofre Coalition comprises the following 12 California and national environmental organizations: Audubon California, California Coastal Protection Network, California State Parks Foundation, Defenders of Wildlife, Endangered Habitats League, Laguna Greenbelt, Inc., Natural Resources Defense Council, Orange County Coastkeeper, Sea and Sage Audubon Society, Sierra Club, Surfrider Foundation and WiLDCOAST/COASTALVAjE.

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) are two joint powers authorities formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County’s public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. More than three hundred thousand people from all over Southern California use TCA’s toll roads each day.  Elected officials from surrounding cities and county supervisorial districts are appointed to serve on each agency’s board of directors. Public oversight ensures that the interests of local communities and drivers are served and that TCA continues to meet the region’s growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

An open house style public hearing will take place on Nov. 29 in Anaheim Hills to discuss the project and address questions

IRVINE, Calif. - November 8, 2016

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) and the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) are studying the construction of a proposed median-to-median tolled Express Connector directly linking the 241 Toll Road with the 91 Express Lanes near the Orange County and Riverside County border. A Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Report / Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared and is available for public review and comment through Jan. 9, 2017.

During peak commute times, more than 40,000 daily drivers travel between Orange County and the Inland Empire and there is currently no direct connection between the 241 Toll Road and the 91 Express Lanes. The new 241/91 Tolled Express Connector would offer an alternative to the existing general purpose connector, which requires traveling across five general purpose lanes on State Route 91 (SR-91) to reach the current carpool lanes and future extension of the 91 Express Lanes scheduled to open in mid-to-late 2017 in Riverside County.

The proposed 241/91 Tolled Express Connector is expected to reduce traffic congestion on the SR-91 general purpose lanes, improve traffic flow and enhance safety by reducing weaving across multiple non-tolled lanes and by providing a direct connection between the 241 Toll Road and the 91 Express Lanes, and help achieve regional goals of reducing emissions by improving movement in congested areas along the 241 Toll Road and SR-91.

TCA and Caltrans welcome the public’s comments at this time. Members of the public can review the environmental document through Jan. 9, 2017 by visiting thetollroads.com/241-91Connector and can submit comments by:

  1. E-mail D12.SR241-91ELC@dot.ca.gov
  2. Mail:      
    Smita Desphande, Generalist Branch Chief
    Caltrans Distrct 12 / “ATTN: 241-91 DSEIR/EIS Comment Period”
    1750 East Fourth Street, Suite 100
    Santa Ana, CA 92705
  3. Phone (657) 328-6533

The public is invited to an open house style public meeting to learn about the proposed project as well as to provide comments about improving regional mobility for drivers who travel between Orange and Riverside Counties.

The meeting will take place from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 29 at the East Anaheim Community Center located at 8201 E. Santa Ana Canyon Road, Anaheim. For those unable to attend the meeting in person, a pre-recorded virtual public meeting will be available for viewing at thetollroads.com/241-91connector.

While early in the process, the public is encouraged to become familiar with the project and provide input, which is essential to ensuring a successful outcome. The project’s environmental phase is expected to be completed in late 2017, if approved, construction would begin in mid-2018.

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) are two joint powers authorities formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County’s 67-mile public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. TCA continues to meet the region’s growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

The Toll Roads Rewards program is a way of saying thank you to more than 840,000 Toll Roads accountholders

IRVINE, Calif. - October 18, 2016

The Toll Roads Rewards program is a simple way of thanking Orange County’s Toll Roads customers for driving the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. The Toll Roads of Orange County is the largest network of toll roads in California and with more than 280,000 daily trips, accountholders can be rewarded for their daily commute.

The Toll Roads FasTrak® and ExpressAccount® members who drive The Toll Roads at least once during the month and opt-in to receive promotional materials, receives a special monthly deal from a local retail partner as a token of appreciation. Monthly deals range from restaurants to theme parks and whale watching excursions to lift ticket discounts at local mountain resorts.

With the first week of the professional hockey season underway, The Toll Roads Rewards members who drive at least once in October will be rewarded with up to 30 percent off the box office price of tickets to select Anaheim Ducks games. November’s Rewards partner features the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Safari Park. Past Rewards partners have included Angels Baseball, Ruby’s Diner, Papa John’s Pizza, Pageant of the Masters and Festival of Arts.

The program is free for The Toll Roads’ accountholders and easy to join – sign up, drive and earn rewards. Here’s how to enroll in The Toll Roads Rewards program:

  1. You must be a FasTrak or ExpressAccount customer with The Toll Roads
  2. Log in to your account at thetollroads.com and click the yellow “Update Contact” button on the right-hand side of the account dashboard
  3. Check the box to opt-in to “News and The Toll Roads Rewards” 
  4. Save changes by clicking on the yellow “Update Contact” button at the bottom of the page
  5. Drive The Toll Roads at least once per month
  6. Watch your email for a reward coupon that is sent mid-month.

The Toll Roads has more than 840,000 FasTrak and ExpressAccounts with more than 320,000 already signed up for The Toll Roads Rewards program. There’s a new offer every month. To learn about upcoming partners and past promotions, visit thetollroads.com/promotions.

“When it comes to getting around Southern California, we know drivers have a choice,” said Lisa Telles, Chief Communications Officer for the Transportation Corridor Agencies. “The Toll Roads Rewards is our way of saying thank you for choosing The Toll Roads in Orange County to get to work and appointments and to visit family and friends.”

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) are two joint powers authorities formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County’s 67-mile public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. TCA continues to meet the region’s growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

Chairman Young to focus on capital project improvements and customer service enhancements in Fiscal Year 2017

IRVINE, Calif. - September 12, 2016

The Board of Directors of the Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency (F/ETCA) elected Craig Young, a Yorba Linda councilman, to serve as Chair of the 15-member Joint Powers Authority for a third term in June. Under Chair Young’s leadership, the Agency will focus on customer service and toll road improvements.

The 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads provide vital links between Rancho Santa Margarita, Irvine and the Orange and Riverside county border, serving residents and businesses of Yorba Linda, Anaheim, Orange, Tustin, Irvine, Ladera Ranch, Lake Forest, Coto de Caza, and Rancho Santa Margarita. The 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads carry nearly 200,000 trips each weekday and tolls are collected electronically with FasTrak® ExpressAccount® or with One-Time-Toll online payments. Toll revenue is primarily used to pay for bonds issued to construct The Toll Roads. 

In Fiscal Year (FY) 2016, which ended June 30, F/ETCA collected $200.3 million and recorded 63,375,504 million transactions on the 36-mile toll system; an increase of 8.5 percent over the previous year. 

In FY17, the F/ETCA Board of Directors will focus on: 

  • 241/91 Express Connector – F/ETCA in coordination with Caltrans, is proposing to add a direct connector from the 241 Toll Road to 91 Freeway Express Lanes. The direct, median-to-median tolled connector would reduce traffic congestion, enhance safety by reducing weaving across the lanes and improve access to toll lanes in Orange and Riverside Counties. A draft environmental document will be released in November for a 60-day public circulation period.
  • South Orange County Transportation Mobility – In FY17, F/ETCA, will continue to collaborate with Caltrans, the Orange County Transportation Authority, regional transportation partners, elected leaders and community stakeholders to work toward solving regional mobility in Southern California. A series of community forums will be held to address transportation mobility concerns and collect and evaluate public ideas on how to solve the region’s major traffic problems. 
  • Enhance Customer Experience – The Toll Roads’ website and mobile app were recently revamped to enhance online toll payments and improve the user’s online experience. In FY17, the process to pay tolls will be simplified and the mobile app will incorporate Apple’s Touch ID feature allowing customers easy access to their account and payments with fingerprint recognition technology. Additionally, F/ETCA recently partnered with major rental car companies to streamline toll payment for rental car drivers and tourists by enabling tolls to be charged directly through the driver’s rental car agreement when they drive The Toll Roads. To date, half a million tolls have been collected through this program. 

The Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency is determined to serve our customers and find the right solution for the mobility challenges facing Orange County residents and commuters,” said F/ETCA Chairman Craig Young. “Our ground-up outreach strategy for solving the region’s traffic problems strengthens our Agencies’ partnerships with stakeholders in a way that addresses mobility challenges and minimizes environmental impacts.”

The Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor, together with its sister agency the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor, make up the Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA). The TCA are two joint powers authorities formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County’s 67-mile public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. TCA continues to meet the region’s growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

Chairman Chun to focus on capital project improvements and customer service enhancements in Fiscal Year 2017

IRVINE, Calif. - September 12, 2016

The Board of Directors of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency (SJHTCA) elected Ross Chun, an Aliso Viejo councilman, to serve as Chairman of the 15-member Joint Powers Authority for a second term in June. Under Chairman Chun’s leadership, the Agency will focus on customer service, toll road enhancements and environmental initiatives for the 15-mile toll road that opened in 1996.

The 73 Toll Road provides a vital link between the John Wayne Airport area and San Juan Capistrano, serving residents and businesses of Newport Beach, Laguna Woods, Aliso Viejo, Laguna Niguel, Laguna Hills and Dana Point. The 73 Toll Road carries an average 100,000 trips each weekday and tolls are collected electronically with FasTrak® ExpressAccount® or with One-Time-Toll online payments. Toll revenue is primarily used to pay for bonds issued to construct the toll road. 

In Fiscal Year (FY) 2016, which ended June 30, SJHTCA collected $176.7 million and recorded 30,589,341 million transactions on the 73 Toll Road; an increase of 9.4 percent over the previous year. 

In FY17, the SJHTCA Board of Directors will focus on: 

  • Customer Service – The Toll Roads’ website and mobile app were recently revamped to enhance online toll payments and improve the user’s online experience. In FY17, the process to pay tolls will be simplified and the mobile app will incorporate Apple’s Touch ID feature allowing customers easy access to their account and payments with fingerprint recognition technology. Additionally, SJHTCA recently partnered with major rental car companies to streamline toll payment for rental car drivers and tourists by enabling tolls to be charged directly through the driver’s rental car agreement when they drive The Toll Roads. To date, half a million tolls have been collected through this program. 
  • Environmental Commitment – Environmental stewardship is a high priority for SJHTCA and FY17 marks 25 years of dedication to long-term environmental protection and management programs. In partnership with the Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency (F/ETCA), more than 2,000 acres of open space has been preserved and restored for native habitat and wildlife as part of The Toll Roads. In FY17, the Agency will pursue transferring mitigation properties to other organizations who will manage the land as open space in perpetuity. 
  • On-Road Experience – In FY17 the Agency is planning to remove toll booths at various ramps along the 73 Toll Road that are no longer used to collect tolls. In addition, due to increased traffic on the 73 Toll Road, engineering studies will be conducted within heavy traffic areas along the route to identify ways to keep traffic free-flowing for daily customers. 

“Last month marked the 20th anniversary of the opening of the first phase of the 73 Toll Road in Aliso Viejo and in November we will celebrate the opening of the second phase that linked south Orange County communities to the John Wayne Airport area,” said SJHTCA Chairman Ross Chun. “It’s hard to imagine what traffic in south Orange County would be like without the 73 Toll Road, taking traffic off I-5 and our city streets helps keep our communities moving and growing.” 

The San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor, together with its sister agency, the Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor, make up the Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA). The TCA are two joint powers authorities formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County’s 67-mile public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. TCA continues to meet the region’s growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

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