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Portions Of Northbound 241 Toll Road To Close This Weekend

55-Hour Closure of Northbound 241 Toll Road between 133 Toll Road and Chapman/Santiago Canyon begins Friday, March 13

IRVINE, Calif. - March 12, 2015

Caltrans crews will completely close the northbound 241 Toll Road between the 133 Toll Road and Chapman/Santiago Canyon off-ramp beginning 10 p.m., Friday, March 13 through 5 a.m., Monday, March 16. All southbound 241 Toll Road lanes will remain open.

This 55-hour closure is necessary to grind and resurface the pavement across all three northbound lanes to repair a dip in the roadway.

Drivers heading north on the 241 Toll Road from Lake Forest or Rancho Santa Margarita, may still access Irvine or Tustin by using the Southbound 133 Toll Road.

Detour signs and electronic message boards are posted and the suggested detour routes are as follows:

For drivers heading north on the 133 Toll Road:

  • Exit Irvine Boulevard and turn left
  • Continue west on Irvine Boulevard*
  • Turn right to enter northbound 261 Toll Road to access northbound 241 Toll Road toward Chapman/Santiago Canyon exit and/or 91 Freeway

For drivers heading north on the 241 Toll Road from South Orange County:

  • Use the southbound 133 Toll Road connector
  • Exit Irvine Boulevard and turn right
  • Continue west on Irvine Boulevard
  • Turn right to enter northbound 261 Toll Road to access northbound 241 Toll Road toward Chapman/Santiago Canyon exit and/or 91 Freeway

*Drivers exiting Northbound 133 at Irvine Boulevard will not be tolled while the closure is underway.

To view this closure and its suggested detours, please visit www.thetollroads.com/closures

Proposed Regional Water Board Decision Violates State Water Board Order

IRVINE, Calif. - March 11, 2015

After nearly two years of the Transportation Corridor Agencies' (TCA) ongoing efforts to obtain a permit to improve mobility within South Orange County and the region, staff of the San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board (Regional Board) has recommended denial of TCA's permit application to extend the 241 Toll Road from its current terminus at Oso Parkway in Rancho Santa Margarita to Cow Camp Road in San Juan Capistrano, also known as the Tesoro Extension.

Despite specific direction from the State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) to adopt detailed findings that explain a legal and factual basis for denial of the permit application, the findings included in the Regional Board's order fails to comply with the State Board's clear direction.

TCA continues to contend that there is no lawful basis for the Regional Board to deny TCA's application to extend the 241 Toll Road five miles as described in the permit application submitted in 2012.

It is disappointing that the Regional Board is refusing to abide by the State Board's order. Denying the extension of a roadway that is desperately needed to alleviate traffic congestion does not solve the region's growing transportation problems. TCA is determined to find the right solution to solve mobility challenges facing South Orange County residents and commuters, and strengthen its partnerships with stakeholders in a way that addresses mobility challenges and minimizes environmental impacts.

TCA submitted a letter to the Regional Board addressing the following points:

  • Failure to provide reasoning - The Regional Board's concerns focus primarily on former alignments that are not part of TCA's existing application. The Regional Board fails to provide their reasoning for denying the Tesoro Extension permit application.
  • Independent utility - The Tesoro Extension can function to provide traffic relief independent of any future extensions; therefore, it has independent utility and should be judged on its own merits.
  • Detailed findings do not exist - The State Board's Order required the Regional Board to adopt detailed findings explaining why they would be limited in their ability to exercise their full authority in the future to restrict waste water discharges from future extensions of the 241 Toll Road. Detailed findings do not exist in the Regional Board's tentative order.
  • Environmental impact reduced - The minimal impact of the Tesoro Extension (0.40 acre) has been reduced further to 0.29 acre due to grading in the area that has been authorized by the Regional Board. The reduction of impact by more than 25 percent is significant new evidence that should be considered by the Regional Board.
  • Setting dangerous precedence - The Regional Board is on the precipice of setting a dangerous precedent that could prevent future infrastructure projects throughout the state from proceeding in stand-alone phases. As documented by several transportation agencies throughout California, numerous transit and highway projects are constructed in phases due to funding or traffic needs. These projects would have never been able to begin construction under the limitations that the Regional Board is considering for the Tesoro Extension.
  • The future of the 241 Toll Road - TCA acknowledges and respects the authority of the Regional Board to restrict water discharges of any future extension of the 241 Toll Road. Based on this fact, there is no reason for the Regional Board to deny the Tesoro Extension permit.

Background
On June 19, 2013, the Regional Board's staff recommended approval of TCA's permit application to extend the 241 Toll Road 5.5 miles. At a hearing prior to the vote, the Regional Board's technical staff testified that TCA's water quality measures proposed in the project met the "gold standard" for protecting water quality. The mitigation measures included installation of a filtration system to treat all runoff water, creating vegetative swales and implementing a system to ensure both water quality and water flow rate would mimic the natural environment.

In a 3-2 vote, the appointed board members rejected the recommendation of the Regional Board's professional staff, despite board members recognizing the toll road extension complied with water quality standards. TCA appealed the Regional Board's decision to the State Board. The State Board stated, "It is unclear from the transcript that concerns about water quality impacts resulting directly from the Tesoro Extension did not form the basis for the San Diego Water Board's decision . . . we are left with no conclusion as to why they voted to not approve the TCA Application."

The State Board concluded that the Regional Board violated state law by failing to adopt findings that explained the legal and factual basis for their decision. The State Board found that for the Regional Board to deny the application, they are required to adopt "detailed findings" explaining "why the Regional Board is limited in its ability to exercise its full authority in the future" to restrict discharges from future extensions of the 241 Toll Road. The State Board ordered this requirement in response to testimony from various transportation agencies throughout California that it is standard practice to permit and construct transportation projects in phases - exactly as proposed by TCA.

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) are two joint powers authorities formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County's 67-mile public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. TCA continues to meet the region's growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

The Toll Roads Media Relations
Sarah Swensson King
Media Relations Manager
SKing@thetollroads.com
949.754.3417

IRVINE, Calif. - January 15, 2015

Drivers should be aware of a phishing email* being sent to drivers across the nation claiming they owe money for unpaid E-ZPass tolls. This is not an email from The Toll Roads of Orange County, the Transportation Corridor Agencies, E-ZPass or E-ZPass tolling agencies.

E-ZPass is used to collect tolls electronically on the East Coast; FasTrak® is used to collect tolls electronically on the West Coast. Please do not open or respond to the email if you receive it. To see an example of the email, please click here.

*Phishing emails, websites and phone calls are designed to steal money.  Cybercriminals can do this by installing malicious software on your computer or stealing personal information off of your computer.  To report a phishing email, forward it to: phishing-report@us-cert.gov.

Low Interest Rates, Improved Credit and Strong Investor Response Results in Present Value Savings of $44 Million

IRVINE, Calif. - October 22, 2014

The San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency today successfully refinanced $1.4 billion of its $2.2 billion in outstanding debt issued to fund construction of the 73 Toll Road. The sale is scheduled to close in early November.

"This is great news for drivers and the communities that surround the 73 Toll Road," said Scott Schoeffel, Chairman of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency, the joint powers authority responsible for financing the 73 Toll Road. "Refinancing improves the agency's long-term financial health by lowering the annual debt service payments and improving financial flexibility."

The bond issue was well received by the market with $2.5 billion in orders for a bond issue sized at $1.4 billion reflecting the 73 toll road's performance, rating upgrade and confidence in the credit profile.

By taking advantage of the current low interest rates, and selling bonds with a nominal maturity of 2050 compared to the current 2042, the annual debt service growth is reduced from 8.8 to 1.7 percent over the next ten years. The interest rate on the restructured bonds averages 4.74 percent. The previous average was 5.72 percent - a reduction of nearly 100 basis points.

"The combination of low interest rates, improved credit rating, and strong investor response resulted in a net present value savings of $44 million," said Amy Potter, Chief Financial Officer for the Transportation Corridor Agencies.

"With this new long-term sustainable debt structure and conservative growth outlook for the 73 Toll Road, the agency will have greater financial flexibility moving forward which may allow the agency to moderate future toll rate increases, withstand economic downturns and potentially pay off the debt ahead of the 2050 final maturity date," said Michael Kraman, Chief Executive Officer for the Transportation Corridor Agencies.

The bond issue consisted of:

  • $1.1 billion in tax-exempt Senior Lien Current Interest Toll Road Revenue Bonds, with a 1.3-times coverage ratio requirement.
  • $300 million in tax-exempt Current Interest Junior Lien Toll Road Refunding Revenue Bonds, with a 1.1-times coverage ratio requirement.

Standard & Poor's and Fitch Ratings have rated the agency's Senior Lien Bonds BBB- and the Junior Lien Bonds BB+. Both ratings are higher than the agency's previous ratings.

The San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency (SJHTCA) is a joint powers authority formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate the 15-mile San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor (SR 73). Elected officials from surrounding cities and county supervisorial districts are appointed to serve on each agency's board of directors. Public oversight ensures that the interests of local communities and drivers are served and that TCA continues to meet the region's growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

The Toll Roads Media Relations
Sarah Swensson King
Media Relations Manager
SKing@thetollroads.com
949.754.3417

IRVINE, Calif. - October 10, 2014

On October 9, 2014, the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency (the "Agency") approved a resolution authorizing the solicitation of offers from the holders of its San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency, Toll Road Refunding Revenue Bonds, Series 1997A Capital Appreciation Bonds (the "1997A CABs") and the Toll Revenue Refunding Revenue Bonds, Series 1997A Convertible Capital Appreciation Bonds maturing in the years 2037-2038 and 2040-2042 (the "1997A CCABs," and together with the 1997A CABs, the "Target Bonds")  to tender Target Bonds for purchase by the Agency (the "Tender Offer").

The Tender Offer is part of the Agency's plan to refinance all of the Agency's San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency, Toll Road Revenue Bonds, Series 1993 (the "1993 Bonds") and refinance or restructure (through a tender or amendment or both) all or a portion of the Target Bonds.

The refinancing/restructuring transaction (the "Transaction") is being undertaken to improve the Agency's financial position by reducing its average annual debt service and by revising certain legal covenants under its indentures to obtain greater financial flexibility. The Transaction is expected to result in all of the Target Bonds remaining outstanding following completion of the Transaction receiving an investment grade category rating by at least two national rating agencies. There can be no assurance that the Transaction will be completed.

The Tender Offer will commence on October 10, 2014, and the Agency expects to distribute Tender Offer materials on or about that date and to post the offer prices for the Target Bonds on the Electronic Municipal Market Access website of the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board, currently located at http://emma.msrb.org, using the CUSIP numbers for the Target Bonds, not later than 5:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, October 15, 2014. The expiration date for the Tender Offer is expected to be October 21, 2014, and the expected settlement date for the purchase of Target Bonds which the Agency elects to purchase, if any, is November 6, 2014.  The Tender Offer, and the purchase by the Agency of Target Bonds (if any) pursuant to the Tender Offer, will be governed by the Invitation to Tender to be included in the Tender Offer materials.

This document and the information contained herein do not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security. Such an offer can only be made pursuant to an Official Statement of the Agency.  Concurrently with the distribution of the Tender Offer materials, the Agency will distribute a Preliminary Official Statement relating to the refunding bonds to be issued by the Agency in connection with the Transaction.

In addition, this document and the information contained herein do not constitute a solicitation of the holders of the Target Bonds to offer to tender their bonds, which shall only be made pursuant to Tender Offer materials to be distributed by the Agency.

The San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency (SJHTCA)is a joint powers authority formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate the 15-mile San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor (SR 73). Elected officials from surrounding cities and county supervisorial districts are appointed to serve on each agency's board of directors. Public oversight ensures that the interests of local communities and drivers are served and that TCA continues to meet the region's growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

The Toll Roads Media Relations
Sarah Swensson King
Media Relations Manager
SKing@thetollroads.com
949.754.3417

Refinancing plan will stabilize long-term debt structure for the 73 Toll Road

IRVINE, Calif. - October 8, 2014

At its regularly-scheduled monthly meeting this Thursday, the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency Board of Directors will consider the issuance of toll road refunding revenue bonds to refinance half or more of its $2.2 billion in outstanding debt issued to fund construction of the 73 Toll Road.

The refinancing takes advantage of current low interest rates in the municipal bond market and recent strong performance of the 73 Toll Road to allow for a refinancing that will improve the agency's long-term financial health.

Contingent upon the execution of the restructuring plan, Standard & Poor's and Fitch Ratings have rated the agency's Senior Lien Bonds at an investment grade level, an improvement over the 73 Toll Road's current bond ratings. The Senior Lien Bonds are rated BBB- by both Standard & Poor's and Fitch Ratings. The Junior Lien Bonds are rated BB+ by both Standard and Poor's and Fitch Ratings.

"The BBB- (EXP) expected rating reflects the effect of the smoother debt service profile following this debt restructuring that, along with robust cash reserving, will leave the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency (SJHTCA) dependent on only modest revenue growth to service debt," reports Fitch Ratings.

The plan restructures the bonds to lower annual debt service growth from 8.8 to 2.3 percent over the next ten years. This is accomplished by taking advantage of low interest rates and by selling bonds with a nominal maturity of 2050 compared to the current 2042. The structure includes call features to allow bonds to be paid off early so the actual final maturity may be well before 2050 depending on future road performance and decisions on toll rates.

Lowering the annual debt service growth rate and bond interest rate, along with the removal of the current requirement to aggressively raise toll rates to maximize revenue, will give the Board of Directors more flexibility to implement toll rate policies that are more in line with inflation.

More than 85,000 vehicles a day use the 73 Toll Road and traffic grew by 5.9 percent in Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14). The refinancing sets new revenue projections that are based on 18 years of actual usage trends and the new debt service growth rate is reduced from 8.8 to 2.3 percent over the next ten years. This is a sustainable plan that will lead to improved mobility in the region.

The Board of Directors will consider finance structure parameters at Thursday's meeting because exact amount and types of bonds to be offered to the market will not be known until the bonds are sold.

As of October 1, 2014, the offering would consist of:

  • $761 million of tax-exempt Senior Lien Toll Road Revenue Bonds (approximately $626 million of which will be Current Interest Bonds and $135 million of which will be Capital Appreciation Bonds).
  • $240 million of tax-exempt Junior Lien Toll Road Refunding Revenue Bonds.
  • The agency will also implement a tender offer and an offer to amend the terms of certain existing bonds that are not callable to further improve the refinancing results. The amount of tax-exempt Senior Lien and/or Junior Lien bonds could be increased by the purchase price the agency would pay if there is a successful tender purchase of Series 1997 bonds that are currently not callable.

Junior Lien bonds will be issued in order to lower costs and improve savings, flexibility and the efficiency of the refinancing. The amount could increase above the $240 million specified above. The Junior Lien bonds have a 1.1-times coverage ratio requirement.

A new bond structure with lower growth rates and advantageous call features will enable the agency to more easily manage its finances in the future.  If revenues grow at a rate faster than the debt service growth rate, future Boards can elect to use excess revenue to pay down the debt sooner or raise tolls at a slower rate.

An average growth rate in gross toll revenues of 3.2 percent is projected between 2015 and 2050.  The new annual debt service starts comfortably below estimated revenues for the next year providing more cushion as debt growth is anticipated to be 3.0 percent or less.  With the call features planned to be imbedded in the restructuring bonds, the agency will have the option of using excess revenues to retire debt early.

The agency originally issued $1.1 billion in bonds in 1993 to finance construction of the 73 Toll Road.  In 1997, the agency issued $1.4 billion of refunding bonds to refinance all but $220 million of the original 1993 bonds.  In 2011, because of the severe financial stresses caused in part by the Great Recession, the agency restructured its debt by means of an agreement with existing bondholders, which amended a number of key covenants in the Master Indenture of Trust and extended the maturities on $430 million of the 1997 bonds to 2042.

The current toll rate covenant requires that toll rates be set annually to achieve maximum revenue as determined by an independent traffic and revenue consultant. This toll setting requirement has resulting in toll rate increases averaging 5.6% FY12, 10% in FY13, 10% in FY14 and 5.9% in FY15. Over the past three years - FY11 to FY14 - revenue grew 33 percent. The new rate covenant will allow for more modest inflationary toll rate increases to achieve the 1.3 times coverage for the annual debt service for the Senior Lien bonds. Upon approval, and dependent on municipal bond market interest rates, the refinancing bonds will be marketed and sold in October.

The San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency (SJHTCA) is a joint powers authority formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate the 15-mile San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor (SR 73). Elected officials from surrounding cities and county supervisorial districts are appointed to serve on each agency's board of directors. Public oversight ensures that the interests of local communities and drivers are served and that TCA continues to meet the region's growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

The Toll Roads Media Relations
Sarah Swensson King
Media Relations Manager
SKing@thetollroads.com
949.754.3417

IRVINE, Calif. - September 22, 2014

On September 11, 2014, the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency approved a resolution authorizing the solicitation of consents from the holders of its San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency, Toll Road Refunding Revenue Bonds, Series 1997A (the "1997A Bonds") in order to implement certain amendments to the authorizing indenture. This consent solicitation is part of the agency's plan to refinance all of the agency's San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency, Toll Road Revenue Bonds, Series 1993 (the "1993 Bonds") and all or a portion of its 1997A Bonds.

The refinancing transaction (the Transaction) is being undertaken to improve the agency's financial position by reducing its average annual debt service and by revising certain legal covenants under its indentures to obtain greater financial flexibility. The Transaction is expected to result in all of the 1997A Bonds remaining outstanding following completion of the Transaction receiving an investment grade category by at least one national rating agency. There can be no assurance that the Transaction will be completed.

The consent solicitation period has not yet commenced. However, the agency expects to distribute consent solicitation materials in the near future. Any consent given pursuant to the solicitation will be of no further force and effect if the Transaction is not consummated by a date specified in the solicitation materials (Solicitation Materials).

This document and the information contained herein do not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security. Such an offer can only be made pursuant to an Official Statement of the Agency. The Agency anticipates preparing an Official Statement in connection with the Transaction.

Nor does this document and the information contained herein constitute a solicitation of the 1997A Bondholders to approve any amendment to an indenture, which shall only be made pursuant to Solicitation Materials to be distributed by the Agency.

The San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency (SJHTCA) is a joint powers authority formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate the 15-mile San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor (SR 73). Elected officials from surrounding cities and county supervisorial districts are appointed to serve on each agency's board of directors. Public oversight ensures that the interests of local communities and drivers are served and that TCA continues to meet the region's growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) are two joint powers authorities formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County's 67-mile public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. A quarter of a million people from all over Southern California use TCA's toll roads each day. Elected officials from surrounding cities and county supervisorial districts are appointed to serve on each agency's board of directors. Public oversight ensures that the interests of local communities and drivers are served and that TCA continues to meet the region's growing need for congestion-free transportation alternatives.

The Toll Roads Media Relations
Sarah Swensson King
Media Relations Manager
SKing@thetollroads.com
949.754.3417

Agency Achieves Refinancing Goals and Reduces Debt Payments by $975 Million Through 2040

IRVINE, Calif. - December 16, 2013

The Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency (F/ETCA) has successfully refinanced $2.3 billion in outstanding debt originally issued in 1999. The deal attracted national attention as one of the largest fixed-rate municipal transactions of 2013.

"This is great news for Southern California drivers," said Lisa Bartlett, F/ETCA Chairwoman and Mayor of the City of Dana Point. "The refinancing enhances the agency's financial position so that we can concentrate on providing and improving mobility. We've lowered annual debt payments, which will provide pricing flexibility and cash flow for important projects."

Traffic and revenue on the F/ETCA's 36-mile toll road network - comprised of State Routes 133, 241 and 261 in Orange County, Calif. - have been growing with Orange County's regional economic recovery. For the first five months of the fiscal year (July thru Dec.), traffic has increased two percent and revenue is up seven percent, compared to the same period the year before.

"The bond refinancing reduces debt payments by $975 million between now and 2040 and will create a flexible financing structure. The restructuring of the debt keeps the agency in a very strong financial position and allows The Tolls Roads to continue to provide a valuable choice for Orange County residents and commuters," said Patricia Bates, F/ETCA Vice Chairwoman and Orange County Fifth District Supervisor.

The refinancing extends F/ETCA debt from 2040 to 2053, lowers annual payments through 2040 and reduces maximum annual debt payment by 24 percent. The bonds are being structured with various call dates and will be eligible for early redemption with excess revenue if the agency's Board of Directors chooses to do so, thereby shortening the final maturity date and eliminating the need to make additional interest payments.  

"The restructuring brings the agency's debt in line with current revenue projections and strengthens our financial outlook," said Amy Potter, CFO of the Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA). "The Board of Directors had authorized up to a 6.5 percent interest rate for the bonds, and the final result was 6.06 percent. The annual growth rate for the bonds has been reduced from 4.2 percent to 3.75 percent and the peak debt service has been reduced by $74 million."

In October, the F/ETCA Board of Directors approved the refinancing of outstanding bonds and amendments to a cooperative agreement between the F/ETCA and Caltrans that allows tolls to be collected through 2053. The following month, the F/ETCA received investment grade ratings from Standard & Poor's and Fitch Ratings on its update to the proposed refinancing of the 1999 bonds.  With two ratings, the agency was able to move forward with the refinancing.

Standard and Poor's noted that revenues have responded well to recent toll increases, that the willingness to increase tolls by management is a positive credit factor and that the restructuring plan reduces maximum annual debt service by $30 million (actual reduction is $72 million). Fitch Ratings acknowledged that extending the debt by 13 years provides a more stable financial profile and that a history of pro-active decisions by management to raise rates is a credit strength.

"The 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads provide a valuable link to the population centers in the Southern California region - which is the second largest metropolitan area in the country. It's a link to a burgeoning economic and employment center that is located in Orange County," said Neil Peterson, TCA's CEO. "We are providing a valuable and affordable service to the people who are coming in and out of Orange County to get to those jobs. Our board has a 13-year history of stepping up to the plate and meeting their financial obligations.Our toll revenues and our transactions have recovered strongly from The Great Recession and in the last three years have seen a steady increase.The refinancing provides cash flow savings to us between now and 2040, reduces the increase of our debt service requirements, lowers our maximum annual debt service, allows us a greater margin to exceed our coverage requirements of net toll revenues going forward."

"The experience that we offer our customers is a choice of a predictable trip that saves time and stress," said Peterson. "The F/ETCA Board of Directors, finance team and staff are commended for the work they have put into making this refinancing a reality."

The Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency (F/ETCA) (is a public agency governed by local elected officials responsible for the planning, financing, construction and operations of State Route 133, 241 and 261. For the most recent fiscal year, F/ETCA transactional toll revenues were up seven percent, total operating revenues were $129.4 million and 56,173,061 transactions were recorded on the roads.

The Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) are two joint powers authorities (the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency and F/ETCA) formed by the California legislature in 1986 to plan, finance, construct and operate Orange County's 67-mile public toll road system. Fifty-one miles of the system are complete, including the 73, 133, 241 and 261 Toll Roads. Elected officials from surrounding cities and county supervisorial districts are appointed to serve on each agency's board of directors.

The Toll Roads Media Relations
Sarah Swensson King
Media Relations Manager
SKing@thetollroads.com
949.754.3417

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